×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Chinese State Media Declares iPhone a Threat To National Security

Soulskill posted about 5 months ago | from the fruit-ninja-must-have-cause-a-lot-of-traffic-deaths dept.

China 143

MojoKid writes: "When NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden came forth last year with U.S. government spying secrets, it didn't take long to realize that some of the information revealed could bring on serious repercussions — not just for the U.S. government, but also for U.S.-based companies. The latest to feel the hit? None other than Apple, and in a region the company has been working hard to increase market share: China. China, via state media, has today declared that Apple's iPhone is a threat to national security — all because of its thorough tracking capabilities. It has the ability to keep track of user locations, and to the country, this could potentially reveal "state secrets" somehow. It's being noted that the iPhone will continue to track the user to some extent even if the overall feature is disabled. China's iPhone ousting comes hot on the heels of Russia's industry and trade deeming AMD and Intel processors to be untrustworthy. The nation will instead be building its own ARM-based "Baikal" processor.

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

First Post (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47434745)

Why is Slashdot full of libtards?

-Most libtards don't have jobs so they can comment on things they don't understand like energy policy all day as they don't care what the working man pays for energy as long as they feel good about controlling people for bullshit reasons like global warming.

-Slashdot posts stories about solar panels and electric cars that appeal to libtards. Libtards love to push shitty technology on everyone to jack up the price of energy so we have to live in a third world hellhole again all over bullshit global warming.

-Slashdot is very LGBTQ friendly. While this in itself is not a problem this combined with all of the libtards means that straight white men are nothing but targets and I'm fucking tired of this!

-Slashdot has the Anonymous Coward feature which means libtards can show their real racist tendencies.

-Lastly most people here love Obama who is the ultimate libtard. Even mention conservatives and you get modded until oblivion.

Re:First Post (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435179)

Did Drudge link to this or something?

Re:First Post (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435405)

Who are you kidding libtard? Drudge never links to this libtard site.

Re: First Post (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435491)

Will my life be better if I reply or pretend I never read what I just read?

(To the parents of children with mental disabilities, I apologize for the above poster's slurring of the mentally retarded.)

Hello dimwit douchebag wageslave! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435739)

Why is Slashdot full of dimwit douchebag wageslaves (like you)?

-Most dimwit douchebag wageslaves have jobs that pay peanuts so they can comment on things they don't understand like "if your money is not working for you, then you are poor instead, working for your money" as they don't care what the smart man says while the dimwit douchebag wageslave's job then gets sent overseas as long as they feel good about controlling people for bullshit reasons like being shot at in a war while the 1% wealthy laugh their asses off at them, drinking margaritas and snorting coke.

-Slashdot posts stories about solar panels and electric cars that appeal to DON'T appeal to dimwit douchebag wageslaves. dimwit douchebag wageslaves love to watch 'wresslin' and to push that fake crap on everyone to jack up the price of the dildo they shove up their ass when nobody's looking so we have to live in a third world hellhole again all over "monday nite football" their god.

-Slashdot is very NOT dimwit douchebag wageslaves friendly. While this in itself is not a problem this combined with all of the dimwit douchebag wageslaves means that REAL straight, intelligent like us libtards you call us white men unlike neanderthalic dolts like you, dimwit douchebag wageslave, are nothing but targets and I'm fucking tired of this!

-Slashdot has the Anonymous Coward feature which means dimwit douchebag wageslaves can show their real racist tendencies AND NAZI SWASTIKA TOO.

-Lastly most dimwit douchebag wageslaves here love Adolf Hitler, Dick Cheney, G.W. Bush who is the ultimate set of neocons. Even mention truth to dimwit douchebag wageslaves (like you) and you get modded until oblivion by dimwit douchebag wageslaves (like you, that have the intelligence of a carrot @ best/most).

Libritard? I take exception to that, u anondouche (0)

MojoKid (1002251) | about 5 months ago | (#47436103)

Hey, Anonodouche, why don't you post under your profile? For the record, this has zero to do with the liberal or conservative agenda. And yeah, I'm f'ing Republicanassholish.

Re:First Post (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47436771)

What are you tired of? By now, your jaws must be in shape to handle all the preacher dick that gets shoved between them.

Hope in humanity is lost (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47434751)

Sigh. How sad it is -we humans- are the very reason why we cannot have nice things.

Re:Hope in humanity is lost (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47436785)

Hope for humanity was lost the instant your parent's frenzied rutting in a restaurant dumpster resulted in your specific gene pattern to combine in a sphlash. And they say two different species can't produce offspring.

Seriously, an iphone? (1)

rcht148 (2872453) | about 5 months ago | (#47434773)

How much work do you do on an iphone that would be a threat to national security?
I thought something like Windows makes more sense.

Re:Seriously, an iphone? (2)

Noah Haders (3621429) | about 5 months ago | (#47434793)

Emails. Calendar. Email attachments. Apple just got pwned.

Re:Seriously, an iphone? (1)

rcht148 (2872453) | about 5 months ago | (#47434891)

Didn't say that there is no exposure at all. Just wanted to say that there are bigger targets out there compared to an iphone.

Re:Seriously, an iphone? (5, Insightful)

gizmo2199 (458329) | about 5 months ago | (#47435067)

IDK, a smartphone is the perfect spying machine.

Not only do people keep their whole lives on their phone, email, pictures, documents, passwords, social media accounts, but the same device is fully portable, has a GPS receiver, picks up and connects to open wifi APs, has a microphone, and accelerometer.

So you can find out what your target is up to, what he's planning, who he's talking to, where he is, and how fast he's moving, and by extension you get acces to his digital life.

Re:Seriously, an iphone? (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about 5 months ago | (#47435213)

The NSA and GCHQ have always wanted more info on China. From flying drones Lockheed D-21 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org] to funding CIA Tibetan program https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org] to using commercial shipping to gather signals intelligence.
China has its own brands of phones to sell, domestically and globally. Why risk staff wondering around with product lines mentioned in connection with foreign intelligence services?

Re:Seriously, an iphone? (5, Informative)

cold fjord (826450) | about 5 months ago | (#47435645)

The NSA and GCHQ have always wanted more info on China.

Isn't turnabout is fair play?.

China's Growing Spy Threat [thediplomat.com]

But according to analysts and officials, the communist-controlled People’s Republic of China operates the single largest intelligence-gathering apparatus in the world—and its growing appetite for secrets has apparently become insatiable.

From economic and military espionage to keeping tabs on exiled dissidents, China’s global spying operations are rapidly expanding. And, therefore, so is the threat. Some analysts even argue the regime—which is also gobbling up such key natural resources as farmland, energy, and minerals—has an eye on dominating the world.

Estimates on the number of spies and agents employed by the communist state vary widely. According to public statements by French author and investigative journalist Roger Faligot, who has written several books about the regime’s security services, there are around two million Chinese working directly or indirectly for China’s intelligence apparatus.

Other analysts say it would be impossible to count the exact number. ‘I doubt they know themselves,’ says Richard Fisher, a senior fellow on Asian military affairs at the Washington-based International Assessment and Strategy Center. Regardless, the number is undoubtedly extraordinary. ‘China can rightly claim to have the world’s largest, most amorphous, but also most active intelligence sector,’ he says.

Russia, China engaging in industrial espionage [thelocal.de]

Germany is full of Russian and Chinese spies working to get information about top business and technology developments, according to the country’s domestic intelligence service.

Studies show that the German economy loses around €50 billion a year as a consequence, Burkhard Even, head of the counterintelligence section of the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution, told the audience at a recent security forum in Bonn. . . .

There are around 80,000 Chinese people living in Germany, Even said, many of whom are commercial spies. China is also buying into, or taking over companies completely, in order to get access to new technological developments. . . . . . the Chinese were mostly active in the electronic sector. Some reports suggest the Chinese intelligence services have up to a million agents across the world collecting technical and business data to support their industries.

[telegraph.co.uk]

"It is estimated that at least 20 Foreign intelligence services are operating to some degree against UK interests. Of greatest concern are the Russians and Chinese. The number of Russian intelligence officers in London has not fallen since the Soviet times."
 

Britain Warned Businesses of Threat of Chinese Spying [nytimes.com]

Canada a target-rich environment for Chinese spies [torontosun.com]

Officials say Chinese spies have targeted every sector of the U.S. economy [nbcnews.com]

Fair Play? (1)

ComputersKai (3499237) | about 5 months ago | (#47435769)

The same also applies as a valid reason against us.

Re:Seriously, an iphone? (2)

dryeo (100693) | about 5 months ago | (#47436717)

The difference is that it is America that is a direct threat to my personal freedom and the personal freedom of much of the world. Remember, for most Americans Constitutional freedoms only apply to American citizens and the rest of us are fair game.

Re:Seriously, an iphone? (1)

demonrob (1001871) | about 5 months ago | (#47435049)

Its not the work on the phone - its the tracking of the location.

Re:Seriously, an iphone? (1)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about 5 months ago | (#47435471)

Its not the work on the phone - its the tracking of the location.

Have these idiots just discovered how cellular phone systems work? Tracking is the very heart of the process.

With the other goodies that the phone has on it, it's always been a security risk. Then again, any smartphone does. Going to ban cellular phone?

Re:Seriously, an iphone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435567)

No, but they might ban any from US companies

Re:Seriously, an iphone? (3, Insightful)

Bing Tsher E (943915) | about 5 months ago | (#47435677)

Tracking is separate from recorded and forwarded history of travel. It has always been possible to hire an agent to follow a specific indivdual. This is different from carrying a device which tracks everybody by default at a very low cost.

An external agent to track dumb cellphones is far more complex than having an agent running inside a smart phone. It involves pretty substantial external resources and doesn't easily scale to large populations.

You knew this, I hope, and were just trolling us. Right?

Re:Seriously, an iphone? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435207)

How much work do you do on an iphone that would be a threat to national security?

Zero is enough.

You're carrying around a camera and microphone and a bunch of other sensors including antennas, and you have no idea what they're recording or when or what they're uploading the recordings to. That's enough. If the bug isn't yours, then it's someone else's.

If you're doing more than zero work with it, then you're extra fucked.

The weird thing about this, is that it's so late. 2014, China?! Here in America we already knew iPhones were working against their users, since 2007. "I can't install just whatever the fuck software I want, and Apple gets to choose what apps are in the one and only store that I'm allowed to use? This isn't a personal computer, it's a game console!"

Actually, I think I might know why this is happening in 2014. I know a guy at Sandia Labs, and he mentioned that recently they started letting 'em take iPhones into the tech areas. So, while we knew the machines were intended to work against their owners, we never knew who the machines were working for. And now we do. By the US allowing iPhones into spooky places, they're implicitly telling everyone "it was US, all along." Most of us probably assumed the user's adversary for the machine's allegiance was Apple, not our government. That might have freaked China out.

Re:Seriously, an iphone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435975)

obviously, you did not pay attention to what snowden said about Windows.

Man vs dragon.. (2)

zr (19885) | about 5 months ago | (#47434811)

Cutthroat competition often manifests this way in china. Cook has his work cut out for him..

Re:Man vs dragon.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435685)

Fuck Apple; they betrayed the US by shipping jobs to the bastion of exploitation, and now the Han are fucking Apple hard after stealing its technology. Hey Cook, bring back American jobs before you whine.

Re:Man vs dragon.. (1)

zr (19885) | about 5 months ago | (#47435969)

great timing pal, just as they managed to start moving jobs back..

Re:Man vs dragon.. (1)

WindBourne (631190) | about 5 months ago | (#47435985)

not really. The best thing that he can do is pull manufacturing from China. Seriously, at this time, Apple can build their own robotics plant here in America and bring it home.

find my iphone (1)

johnrpenner (40054) | about 5 months ago | (#47434831)

they want — we find you.

find my iphone — no good.

Not just iPhone (5, Insightful)

xfizik (3491039) | about 5 months ago | (#47434835)

Anything coming out of the U.S. is a threat to everybody else's national security.

Re:Not just iPhone (4, Interesting)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about 5 months ago | (#47435007)

Anything coming out of the U.S. is a threat to everybody else's national security.

Actually, anything with practically opaque internals is a potential security hole, including processors, compiled software, network equipment. Also anything involving telecommunications.

If China is picking on only Apple, I'd wager it's to drum up business for some company that's owned by a state or an official.

Re:Not just iPhone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435291)

Intentions, intentions, a regular occurrence here.. so this could be a positive. ;}

Not just iPhone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435361)

The "threat to Chinese national security" is that the iPhone isn't sufficiently exploited and that any existing exploits are not sufficiently controlled by the Chinese government.

The new phone will correct that, no doubt.

Re:Not just iPhone (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435967)

See the harm that Snowden caused? The American worker is going to be out of a job, and the American economy is going to take a nose dive in the global market, all because Snowden didn't keep his big mouth shut.

If he HAD kept his mouth shut...long with every other consultant the government spying agencies worked with....along with every other full time employee of said spying agencies...along with every disgruntled ex employee of said spying agencies....along with every hostile infiltrator that might attack said spying agencies in the future....then everything would have been FINE!

The fact that this was going on at all is completely irrelevant. The politicians overseeing these operations are in the clear, because the work they were doing was only used for enlightened purposes by an enlightened government, which totally justifies it. No, these agencies didn't cause all this harm, the leakers did.

Re:Not just iPhone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47436737)

Do you believe what you just wrote? Really?

Well - it seems an idiot is born every day...

Re:Not just iPhone (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 5 months ago | (#47436477)

Anything coming out of the U.S. is a threat to everybody else's national security.

That sort of absolutist anti-American rant is ever popular on Slashdot, but it is nonsense, rubbish. It is like listening to a teenager chafing under parental authority complain that his parents are worse than Hitler when it is with practical certainly not true.

The US has helped keep the free world free since the end of World War 2, and some people resent that and the failure of their preferred ideology.

Re:Not just iPhone (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47436501)

Pardon me coldfjord, but the US is now a police state.

You have only yourself to blame... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47434849)

Dear China: YOU BUILT IT. I think if it was a problem, you'd have mentioned something before now...

And do you really want to push the "national security" button on the iPhone, of all things?
How much money does manufacturing those beautiful little bits of Americana add to your bottom line?
I notice you're not complaining about Samsung, or any of your own local phones. How much less do they track people?

Re:You have only yourself to blame... (1)

KingOfBLASH (620432) | about 5 months ago | (#47435021)

This could just be an excuse to avoid sending butt loads of cash to America to buy iphones.

After all, China has no problems with oppressive technologies. You'd think they'd be lining up to get some of that iphone tracking goodness and further control their population.

Re:You have only yourself to blame... (1)

ComputersKai (3499237) | about 5 months ago | (#47435795)

After all, China has no problems with oppressive technologies. You'd think they'd be lining up to get some of that iphone tracking goodness and further control their population.

...but not when the N-Ass-A is also doing that job.

Re:You have only yourself to blame... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47436011)

Yup. China has some of the harshest tariffs in the world. Sadly, America is not doing a thing about it.

Re:You have only yourself to blame... (4, Insightful)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 5 months ago | (#47435029)

Dear China: YOU BUILT IT. I think if it was a problem, you'd have mentioned something before now...

China only does assembly. They do not design the chips, and they do not write the software.

Re:You have only yourself to blame... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435707)

China only does assembly. They do not design the chips, and they do not write the software.

They just steal the designs and code.

Re:You have only yourself to blame... (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#47435241)

Dear US: If you want to spy on yourself, more power to you. But we're not as dumb as you are.

signed, China.

Re:You have only yourself to blame... (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435775)

Your ignorance is embarrassing. Please tell me you don't live in the US because we have already exceeded our quota for dimwits and morons for the remainder of the century. I suppose you believe only the US runs foreign intelligence programs and every other country on the planet is just standing around with their hands in their pockets? China is going after Apple because they have assimilated (stolen) all the technology they need to make their own iPhone and they really don't like any domestic competitors to their state owned enterprises. I can't believe the number of companies that even allow their products to be assembled in China because all foreign owned businesses are required to sign away their rights to proprietary technologies for anything built and sold in China and don't waste your time on copyrights. Google folded up shop after China wanted access to their data centers which for some reason Google considers proprietary and goes out of its way to keep secret. If Apple did not see and plan ahead for this turn of events it just shows how inept they are becoming. The US catches the Chinese stealing everything from EMP shielded computer chips to hybrid corn and soybean seeds from the US on a regular basis. And come to think of it their stealth jet fighter bears a striking resemblance to the F-22 and F-35 but that could just be a coincidence. And to be fair China is not the only country who couldn't build a stealth fighter until the US showed them it could be done, showed them how to do it, and finally showed them how to actually use it. Their cyber mischief is well documented but at least the US gives as good as it gets in this area and there is nothing wrong with a little spirited competition. Don't misunderstand me. I travel to China several times a year and have always been treated well and the people are very friendly. It is a very interesting country with a very long history. It is a shame the US and China relations crumbled after WW2. On the other hand the pricks I constantly run into in Europe think the President of the US personally consults me before deciding who to bomb. And for some reason they think they actually know and understand the US but every time they open their mouths they prove just the opposite. On the spying front I think it is past time for the US to start using some of that information they have collected over the years and enlighten the masses about what other countries get up to when they think nobody is looking. If the NSA and CIA do even half of what they are accused of doing they should have some pretty good stuff to release. They can start with Germany since they are really working hard to win the "Biggest Hypocrite in the World" award. They should count themselves lucky the US let them have their country back instead of just making it another US state. After all some one released a recorded conversation using an illegal phone tap on the US Embassy in the Ukraine and I am pretty damn sure the NSA or CIA did not do it. Everyone seemed to praise but woefully misrepresented the contents of the recording but no one brought up the inconvenient fact that the recording was actual proof someone was illegally spying on the US embassy and that someone released the information to specifically harm US interests at the time. The US should start returning the favor and really start shaking things up. If they take a smart and measured steps they can get WW3 kicked off ahead of schedule so I won't have to watch the war on CNN from the nursing home.

Re:You have only yourself to blame... (1)

HiThere (15173) | about 5 months ago | (#47436021)

You are embarassing. The GP was right about ONE of the messages being sent by this action. It's probably also intended to help a local company. And It's probably also intended to assist in upcoming negotiations with Apple. Etc.

Don't think that a government announcement sends only one message. Each one sends multiple messages.

Also, don't think that just because China has no problem spying on itself, that it wants anybody else to do so, no matter what it, itself, does abroad. The Chinese government is historically more insular and self-centered than even the US government, and with good reason. China holds most of the world's population, just as Africa holds most of the worlds genetic diversity (among humans). If Africa weren't so fragmented they would also be justified in thinking of the rest of the world as "insignificant tag-ends".

FWIW, you might consider that the current supercomputer speed record is held by a Chinese computer. They may have copied much of the technology from elsewhere, but they've certainly improved on it locally.

P.S.: Much of the information that you refer to as being stolen was actually transferred under contractual terms. I will grant that this isn't true of all of it, but if you look back a couple of centuries, you'll see that the North American colonies, and later the United States did a lot of technology stealing from Britain. As well as getting a lot of it via contractual transfer.

Re:You have only yourself to blame... (1)

Guy Harris (3803) | about 5 months ago | (#47436097)

China holds most of the world's population

(By "most" you presumably mean "a plurality"; most of the world's ~7 billion people don't live in China, with its ~1.4 billion people.)

Re:You have only yourself to blame... (1)

rtb61 (674572) | about 5 months ago | (#47435487)

They build the hardware, however they do not make or have access to the source code or take the lions share of the profits. So more a source code demand along with an economic preference as well as pay back for communications exclusions. You seriously didn't think there were not going to be repercussions for that. The government of China knows full well the US government is run by US corporations, hence any actions taken by the US government against China's interests will be paid back by economic attacks upon US or applicable multi-national corporations. Thus forcing the US or multinational corporations to make their puppet alter it's policies with regard to China. Get used to it, every time the US misbehaves Russia and China as well as large chunks of the rest of the world will take it out against those that control the US government and force policy change.

Re:You have only yourself to blame... (2)

ComputersKai (3499237) | about 5 months ago | (#47435781)

I notice you're not complaining about Samsung, or any of your own local phones. How much less do they track people?

Proprietary software means that they have no way of checking if anything is built in. Though this is likely an attempt by China to boost their own companies' advantages in the market, they have justifiable reasons regarding the security of U.S. closed-source software.

Re:You have only yourself to blame... (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 5 months ago | (#47436009)

Dear China: YOU BUILT IT. I think if it was a problem, you'd have mentioned something before now...

China didn't build the OS, and that's where the concern comes from.

Re:You have only yourself to blame... (1)

sjames (1099) | about 5 months ago | (#47436843)

Perhaps the U.S. should also declare the iPhone to be a security threat.

Agreed! (1)

dysmal (3361085) | about 5 months ago | (#47434893)

Agreed simply because of how many people are too busy staring at their phones and not paying attention to their surroundings to notice that a tank is about to run them over in Tiananmen Square!

Re:Agreed! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47434953)

Agreed simply because of how many people are too busy staring at their phones and not paying attention to their surroundings to notice that a tank is about to run them over in Times Square!

Fixed that for you.

Made in China (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47434895)

I guess China doesn't want Apple's business anymore.

Let me guess... (1)

maccodemonkey (1438585) | about 5 months ago | (#47434901)

China is going to shortly release a state sponsored phone running their own OS and hardware that is totally "secure."

It's understandable that a nation like China would want to get in on the cell phone industry more deeply. Being able to insure a monopoly in China by scaring everyone away from the competition would create a huge, profitable industry internally. I just have a hard time taking what they're saying at face value.

And yes, before someone mentions it, I know the US does similar things for their own ends.

Re:Let me guess... (2)

Opportunist (166417) | about 5 months ago | (#47435247)

The odd thing is that it is actually even likely that it's going to be more secure.

Once I have to turn for a communist country to get freedom I guess it's time to start drinking heavily.

Re:Let me guess... (1)

HiThere (15173) | about 5 months ago | (#47436037)

I thought they already had a couple, but perhaps those are from Tiawan.

Do they know or not care? (1)

djupedal (584558) | about 5 months ago | (#47434935)

GM, Tesla, etc. all track you in real time...regardless of what country you may be in, so...is this just a push for domestic product? Remember that although Apple has a small percentage of the cellphone market in China, it has a large percentage of the smartphone market.

They're Absolutely Right (2)

preaction (1526109) | about 5 months ago | (#47434937)

They're right, it _is_ a privacy/security hole. Most people just don't care. Apparently including me.

Good. Hit them in the pocketbook they'll push back (1)

AnontheDestroyer (3500983) | about 5 months ago | (#47434987)

To be honest, I don't know much about the tracking feature, but it sounds like something where if one big corporation takes a hit, we'll see more push back from others. Make an example of them. (Please note, I own a lot of Apple products, I'm not anti-Apple by default, just on this issue.)

Some temporary or permanent haircut to their profits is the only way to reach them.

The Russian CPU is guaranteed to have more holes, if any of them are in fact flawed, though. Their citizens are nuts if they don't think so.

Re:Good. Hit them in the pocketbook they'll push b (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435043)

Except the features and experiences I want tend to need to keep track of my location...

Re:Good. Hit them in the pocketbook they'll push b (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435077)

The Russian CPU is mostly aimed at the military/government market, not for the typical consumer, meaning that it most likely will not have any specially built backdoors.

Re:Good. Hit them in the pocketbook they'll push b (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about 5 months ago | (#47435249)

Re The Russian CPU is guaranteed to ...... just be a cpu
A Russian cpu would be like a cpu made in China - a cpu that can do some computing tasks at a price and speed that is still useful without questions surrounding its import, a stop over when shipped as part of a larger system. Jobs, security, growth and a full understanding of every aspect of the cpu design.

pot and kettle (4, Insightful)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about 5 months ago | (#47434989)

China is right: the iPhone is a gaping security hole.

I also have little doubt that their "solution" will also be a gaping security hole, except that it will be designed so only China's intelligence services can exploit it.

China for Nobel Prize? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435003)

Bravo to China for holding Apple privacy accountable the way us Americans should.
If the US Government and it's ears the NSA are allowed to violate the 4th amendment,
Then what country can responsibly allow it's citizens to consume our "big brother in a box".

Re:China for Nobel Prize? (1)

HughJazz (3715809) | about 5 months ago | (#47435193)

China is right to not trust American tech products but unfortunately China also acts like big brother when it comes to privacy. Chinese citizens are heavily spied on by the Chinese government. All this spying is achieving is balkanizing the tech industry. At the moment If someone wants privacy it's a nobrainer one doesn't buy tech from countries that behave in wholesale spying i(i.e. US, China, GB, and possibly a few more).

Does your CPU spy one you? (1)

gizmo2199 (458329) | about 5 months ago | (#47435013)

Let's say a hypothetical security service, such as the Norway Safety Alliance (NoSaal), wanted to collect intelligence by putting in a backdoor, secret registers, or something in a CPU manufactured by another hypothetical entity called Ingal, how would they do it?

What intelligence gathering capability could you include in a CPU that would 1) not interfere in the normal functionality of the PC, or otherwise be detectable by the end-user?

I've read that an entity like nosaal could read the electrical hum of the CPU from a distance to determine what it's doing, or maybe grab crypto keys that way.

But could Ingal actually put code or some other way dope their CPUs without anyone knowing?

And more importantly if that's the case, what could we do about?

Re:Does your CPU spy one you? (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about 5 months ago | (#47435355)

The phone would be ship with a local version of an international treaty like
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org]
If it is for sale and connects to your nations phone towers: call voice, location, tower dump, images, mic turn on would all be a nice list of law enforcement options.
Its in the hardware and software layers that no average user can see but would be dual use to make the call on your telco network. You input a number or letter it is 'sent' as part of the networking or kept in memory as part of its normal user functionality. So yes new clean telco layer "code" could find its way down onto your phone as they just track your phone per tower.
re what could we do about? Meet face to face without a phone? Buy a type writer? One time pad on paper? The phone as offered in many countries is a tracking beacon, camera, live microphone for voice prints, web bug and key logger :)

Baikalnization (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435093)

> The nation will instead be building its own ARM-based "Baikal" processor.

I can just see each "world power" building their own ARM-based processor.
Care to suggest one from ?

made in china (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435099)

you'd think by know they'd have the whole thing disassembled and hacked apart to know exactly what makes them tick. after all, how the hell are they gonna put their own spy shit into them before export?

hum.. can't hide those concubines any more.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435105)

yep, ching officials visiting concubines on office hours are now exposed via iPhone geo-locators. This can't be good for national security..

Re: hum.. can't hide those concubines any more.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435499)

I don't think we still use the term "ching" in pleasant company.

Wait a second (4, Interesting)

Maxwell (13985) | about 5 months ago | (#47435117)

I tired to find the original source. Don't see it. Instead all we have is "

A report by broadcaster CCTV criticized the iPhone's "Frequent Locations" function for allowing users to be tracked and information about them revealed.

"This is extremely sensitive data," said a researcher interviewed by the broadcaster. If the data were accessed, it could reveal an entire country's economic situation and "even state secrets," the researcher said."

This is far, far from a government decree. The American equivalent would be an interview on PBS. Other than approving it to air, this has nothing to do with the government. I suspect most Chinese will see right through this, it may even help Apple sales.

Re:Wait a second (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about 5 months ago | (#47435381)

Would you risk your wage, good apartment, work, clearance, international travel, health care, pension, rank on been reported with consumer telco junk?

Re:Wait a second (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47436503)

Not as far as you would think. It's common for the government to air this type of story and then judge the reactions to decide what to do next. It's nothing like PBS in America.

The Chinese market won't last forever (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435123)

Non-Chinese companies (sometimes thru Foxconn) employ Chinese workers to build parts (ex: processors) and/or entire devices (ex: phones). Some of the managers in the Chinese factories are Chinese. I'd guess the repair people, who repair damaged manufacturing equipment, are Chinese.

So they learn to staff and run a factory that manufactures electronic devices. Now that they know how to do so, why do they need American companies? They will start manufacturing the parts themselves, moving in the direction of making the entire device themselves. Once they can make their own devices, the government can require that their people buy those devices, only if made by they were made by Chinese companies. For "security reasons", of course.

I suggest Tim Cook remember that the Chinese market won't last forever. Sooner or later, Chinese companies will make phones, tablets, etc., and the Chinese people will buy those devices, not Apple devices.

Re:The Chinese market won't last forever (1)

PPH (736903) | about 5 months ago | (#47435415)

And then perhaps the Chinese will return the iPhone trademark to the stove company [regmedia.co.uk] .

Re:The Chinese market won't last forever (1)

m00sh (2538182) | about 5 months ago | (#47436275)

Non-Chinese companies (sometimes thru Foxconn) employ Chinese workers to build parts (ex: processors) and/or entire devices (ex: phones). Some of the managers in the Chinese factories are Chinese. I'd guess the repair people, who repair damaged manufacturing equipment, are Chinese.

So they learn to staff and run a factory that manufactures electronic devices. Now that they know how to do so, why do they need American companies? They will start manufacturing the parts themselves, moving in the direction of making the entire device themselves. Once they can make their own devices, the government can require that their people buy those devices, only if made by they were made by Chinese companies. For "security reasons", of course.

I suggest Tim Cook remember that the Chinese market won't last forever. Sooner or later, Chinese companies will make phones, tablets, etc., and the Chinese people will buy those devices, not Apple devices.

Anything can happen in the future. We want phones now and cheap and they can make it now. If you care so much about the future and craft it so cautiously, even the smallest of changes in technological advancements will wreck all your future plans.

Technology moves so fast and China has always been one step behind, one version behind. Doesn't mean they will ever catch up unless they invest heavily in R&D and actually catch with the big boys. By the time they learn something, it has been improved on and moved on. Sure, they can catch the low margin markets in mature technology but never in high margin technology.

On the other hand, maybe they will catch up and make competing products. Are you really scared of a little competition? On the other hand, technology will move even faster with a larger consumer base and a larger number of companies making cutting edge products.

NSA destroying American jobs (1)

HughJazz (3715809) | about 5 months ago | (#47435147)

NSA spies on everyone to "protect" us from tyrants that would spy on everyone. Makes sense. As a bonus the NSA has also done a fantastic job trimming down American tech industry jobs. Given the rampant unrepentant Orwellian spying surely every foreign government and corporation is eager to buy American technology products now.

Re:NSA destroying American jobs (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435223)

THEY TOOK ER FERXKERN JERBS

Re:NSA destroying American jobs (1)

m00sh (2538182) | about 5 months ago | (#47436299)

NSA spies on everyone to "protect" us from tyrants that would spy on everyone. Makes sense. As a bonus the NSA has also done a fantastic job trimming down American tech industry jobs. Given the rampant unrepentant Orwellian spying surely every foreign government and corporation is eager to buy American technology products now.

I was reading some books published in the 2008 and 2009. NSA was viewed as the stalwart of the security aspect of the internet, valiantly contributing to security software and keeping things organized and secure in that front.

I think NSA should have done the opposite of what they did. Instead of spying, they should have created anti-spying tools and issued alerts on spying and privacy aspects of modern technology.

Even if they created spying technology, it should have been created to prevent such spying by putting those tools out in public and letting security researchers figure out methods to solve these security and privacy problems. US software would then be seen as solid and trustworthy, and the whole world would have no problem using US software knowing that it is constantly monitored for security and privacy.

Retaliation for our treatment of Huawei and ZTE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435421)

This is China's shot back against the US for the near constant static Huawei and ZTE get anytime they try to do anything in the US, including Congress having hearing on their being a security threat, etc. Nothing to see here.

And for the record, from a security and privavy standpoint at least, I'll take an iPhone any day over an Android.

Re:Retaliation for our treatment of Huawei and ZTE (3, Interesting)

WaffleMonster (969671) | about 5 months ago | (#47435809)

And for the record, from a security and privavy standpoint at least, I'll take an iPhone any day over an Android.

I'll take Android ASOP/custom rom over carrier shitware infested Android + Google play services or the iPhone any day.

Amazing how much longer battery lasts when your phone is not constantly violating your privacy and wracking up data usage for stupid reasons.

Baikal? (1)

Stargoat (658863) | about 5 months ago | (#47435453)

Didn't Remington import for a number of years shotguns from a Russian company called Baikal? They were terrible guns for any use other than a club, poorly balanced and an action that made an I beam look flexible. But if you wanted a gun to club someone with, a Baikal was an awesome choice. It made a hellagood club - stout and durable. Thing was built like a tank.

Tracking Chinese iPhone users is a Feature (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435463)

It improves the chance that they'll be seen using their stylish expensive new iPhones.

What if they know something we don't? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435465)

Like the iPhones are rigged to be US surveillance devices? They're pretty proprietary and thus very closed, so it's possible -- a hidden vulnerability could exist. Guess that means I should continue not buying an iPhone.

Re:What if they know something we don't? (1)

HiThere (15173) | about 5 months ago | (#47436105)

Well...I'm not sure how hidden it is. We know that they are Apple surveilance devices, and we know that Apple will roll over if the Feds ask them to.

That said, I'd be surprised if there weren't zero-day exploits that haven't yet been made public. OTOH, the same is true for EVERY smart phone.

We've also be informed that the NSA records 80% of all voice conversations. (True? False? No way to check.) This plausibly means that they have all cell phone towers bugged. So they probably rarely need to bother Apple for the information.

Siri clearly requires that the phone know where you are to properly understand you. (Also to communicate with you.)

Etc.

So whether they were intentionally designed for the purpose of being a surveilance device or not (I lean towards not) the capabilities are there. It has also been reported that the microphones and cameras can be remotely activated without signal to the user. Bug or feature? Or did it start out as a bug, but has not been documented?

Whatever, what Apple has been accused of seems blatantly true. But perhaps a result of feature creep than of malign intentions.

Build in china, or can't sell there? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435483)

Well, who knows what happened behind the scenes? I'm guessing Tim Cook is trying to move more manufacturing out of China, and some Chinese government official is punishing him for it. "You build your stuff here, or you can't sell it here."

Golden era for intelligence agencies wordwide (1)

Trachman (3499895) | about 5 months ago | (#47435613)

Imagine Chinese have the ability not only to track location of every phone, but also to activate at will. In the past intelligence operations took year to find important targets, establish contacts, recruiting and learning about inner working of organizations of interests. In order to spy now all you need is a telephone # or email. That being said, would you be comfortable if you knew that Chinese have a capacity to listen not only the phone calls but also to record conversations near the phone at any time. Perhaps there are many professions where it does not matter what the telephone holder is talking about, but there are plenty of professions that can have a profound impact to security: military, intelligence, scientific areas for example. The truth is people are conditioned to assume that it is ok if someone listens, but it is also truth that every government have state secrets and China is no exception.

I'm glad (3, Insightful)

WaffleMonster (969671) | about 5 months ago | (#47435703)

Here is my problem with Apple, Google and Microsoft.

Each vendor is using crowd sourced location / WiFi sniffing / map building excuses to collect location data from everyone. At least one vendor offers no ability to disable crowd sourcing without also preventing GPS from being used.

GPS ASIC's have advanced to the point where standard excuses (uses too much power, takes too long to get a fix, some indoor use) are no longer applicable. This appears to in no way be discouraging vendors from selecting shitty GPS components while propagating excuses which unnecessarily eat into data plans and upload all of your data.

Think of this from the Chinese perspective. Instead of everyone's location data being uploaded to Google or Apple ... what if it was all going to Huawei? Would US officials be comfortable with data about everyone's location constantly uploaded "anonymously" to Huawei?

I think we are all better off if vendors used more capable GPS chips in their handsets and location data is not constantly being uploaded to any single vendor for any reason by default.

The real reason? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47435839)

Likely the real reason is that the latest models are thwarting all forensic examination due to their encryption protection mechanisms. If you can't see what the owner was doing with the phone you cant accuse them of actions against the State. You cant use it as evidence unless you can break the encryption keys.

Good way to gut-punch the US economy (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 5 months ago | (#47435861)

Apple represents a freaking quarter of the US economy. One company. Making locked-down toy computers.

We're living in a sci-fi dystopia.

Re:Good way to gut-punch the US economy (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 5 months ago | (#47436805)

Apple represents a freaking quarter of the US economy.

Uh, math is hard for you or something?

It Really Does (2)

Jim Sadler (3430529) | about 5 months ago | (#47435977)

Being able to track people really could have a negative effect on national security. For example one might determine locations where a lot of people with advanced degrees in physics or know to have special ability in subjects such as high powered lasers congregate. The workplaces of many of these folks could easily be national defense facilities. People know to specialize in encryption might also congregate at certain workplaces. Even purchasing certain books may lead to individuals that an enemy might want to target or even corrupt or kidnap.

laptop (1)

hendrikboom (1001110) | about 5 months ago | (#47436185)

Still waiting for my ARM Linux laptop with a good touchscreen.

Origin (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47436375)

Wait... what is the Chinese government talking about?
You mean the phones that Apple gets from the Foxconn factory that is in China?
And so the Chinese government decided that launching a media campaign within their nation would be far more effective than just stopping those factories?

Any device with GPS capabilities is a threat... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47436573)

Unless you physically disconnect the gps antenna in your phone, companies like Apple and Google will continue to track you even without your consent. This is most evident under their security settings. However, Google does gives the option to disable it even though they state that they'll continue to track you regardless of whether or not you disable it.

So unless you're afraid to take apart your phone to physically disable GPS capabilities, you're gonna have to buy a gps jammer.

Not a threat to security (1)

SpaghettiPattern (609814) | about 5 months ago | (#47436647)

Not a threat to security. More of a threat to global mental health.

Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#47436673)

this could potentially reveal "state secrets" somehow

Whoa. Who knew so many Chinese lived in China?!?

Bing it on! (1)

Tablizer (95088) | about 5 months ago | (#47436689)

because iMaps had citizens crashing into military buildings.

WAAAAYYYY to late (1)

Ryanrule (1657199) | about 5 months ago | (#47436719)

sorry china.
you infected yourself with american popular culture.
there is no cure.
now buy our shitty hollywood action flicks by the billions.
next up, beer and weed.
and we just started selling the mustang in china, with the v8.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?