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New Tool Cracks Apple's FairPlay DRM

pudge posted more than 10 years ago | from the fair-use-shall-win-the-day dept.

Media (Apple) 1126

goombah99 writes "PlayFair is an integrated utility that removes the DRM from AAC music files protected by Apple's FairPlay encryption. Information is limited, but the source code is on SourceForge.net and it appears to actually remove the encryption itself and not simply hijack the QuickTime audio stream as earlier methods did. The cracking operation can only be done on songs the user has already has valid licenses for and requires either an iPod or a windows computer for key recovery. If you choose to redistribute these songs you will be violating the contract you bought them under: better hope they aren't watermarked or you might end up paying for releasing one in the wild. To me the authors are vandals not revolutionaries, and may have ensured WMA becomes the standard."

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Lies (5, Insightful)

monstroyer (748389) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773598)

1) My computer, my data, my choice. DRM snake oil providers can deal with it. The future won't tolerate the crap these copywrite perverters are trying to enforce, may as well wake up now before it's too late.

2) Downloading music does not affect sales. [dailytarheel.com] DRM is only there to appease the record industry, still scared shitless that artists can have direct contact with their fans who still provide them with income. This cuts them out as the middleman. Like the landlord [landandfreedom.org] of times before us, they will be replaced or burnt to the ground. Again, deal with it.

3) The previous two paragraphs are both 'revolutionary' premises. Vandals these coders are not.

FR (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773605)

First Reply!

Re:Lies (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773624)

God god, what a stupid comments. Jeeze. You sir are not a revolutionary. If you are, we truely are screwed.

Re:Lies (1, Insightful)

csoto (220540) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773630)

Except that it's NOT your data. You have a license to use it.

Apple's DRM is pretty benign. I can live with it. They worked out a lot of rights for their customers.

Re:Lies (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773706)

Apple's DRM is considerably more restrictive than WMA's. All sound quality aside, Apple gives you one store, one media player, and one portable player. WMA gives you many stores, several players, and quite a few portables.

Apple seems benign when you're willing to completely surrender every aspect of your machine (including the choice not to boot ;)) over to them.

Re:Lies (4, Insightful)

csoto (220540) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773742)

Whatever. I can play the songs on my Macs, my Dell and my iPod. I can burn CDs and play it in my car, on my stereo, in my portable CD player. Not very restrictive at all. That works for me.

Besides, I can buy MP3s from anywhere else. Oh wait. Who sells those?

Re:Lies (1)

InfiniterX (12749) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773779)

eMusic, while not unlimited anymore, still sells VBR MP3's without any restrictions, and it was already pre-filtered from the likes of Nickelback and Avril Lavigne.

Re:Lies (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773798)

Whatever. I can play the songs on my Macs, my Dell and my iPod. I can burn CDs and play it in my car, on my stereo, in my portable CD player. Not very restrictive at all. That works for me.
Great. Sounds like you've found something that is still more restrictive than WMA music, but you're happy with it.

Besides, I can buy MP3s from anywhere else. Oh wait. Who sells those?

http://www.magnatune.com/ [magnatune.com] for starters.

Re:Lies (5, Insightful)

Alsee (515537) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773772)

You have a license to use it.

No such thing. Doesnt' exist.

You can only licence the right to create new copies and derivative copies and to distribute those copies and for public performances. Those are the only licences that exist (at least under US law anyway).

You don't need any licence at all for any sort of fair use.

Apple's DRM is pretty benign... They worked out a lot of rights for their customers.

It doesn't matter WHAT rights that "worked out". The fact is that ALL fair use is perfectly legal and legitimate, and a copyright holder has absolutely no legal right to say squat when I make fair use.

Unauthorized use and unauthorized copies are perfectly legal and legitimate when they are fair use.

-

Re:Lies (2, Interesting)

catbutt (469582) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773656)

Downloading music does not affect sales.

It's affected sales to me. I stopped buying cd's when napster first came out, and haven't since. I bought two songs on itunes, but eventually uninstalled it because it is so pathetically slow in windows.

Re:Lies (5, Funny)

seffala (134325) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773688)

The plural of 'anecdote' is not 'data'.

Re:Lies (4, Insightful)

Neil Blender (555885) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773795)

The plural of 'anecdote' is not 'data'.

Duh, the the plural of 'anecdote' is 'Slashthink'.

Re:Lies (0, Flamebait)

xluserpetex (666816) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773787)

well then, all that proves is that you're a jackass.

Re:Lies (1)

Llywelyn (531070) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773801)

Good for you?

You seem to be confusing yourself and the industry. The question is whether it has affected sales [i]overall[/i], not whether you personally have stopped purchasing as a result.

Re:Lies (4, Insightful)

neverkevin (601884) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773687)

My computer, my data, my choice

Technically it is not your data, you did not write it, create it or anything, you just payed for the ability to listen to it. I doubt iTMS is selling the legal copyrights to songs for only $.99 a piece.

Re:Lies (2, Insightful)

gothzilla (676407) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773774)

Unfortunately its not your data. You get the music by agreeing to the terms. Your choice was to get the music with DRM.

It's rather silly to then jump up and down about how you disagree with DRM when you agreed to it in the first place.

We can only hope WMA will win! (5, Insightful)

SeanTobin (138474) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773602)

Wouldn't it be wonderfull once the WMA standard becomes available everywhere? All online music stores will use it because it will be so secure. On-demand video companies will spring up from this new found industry standard. Portable players and home stereo systems will all support it. Every media file on your computer will fall under one standard.

And then a code monky from Argentina will be codeing at 3am and have a Mountain Dew inspired breakthrough, and WMA will be broken wide open forever.

Software companies continue to forget the days of dongles, code wheeles, and manual page/paragraph/word lookups. All it will do is annoy real consumers.

Re:We can only hope WMA will win! (5, Insightful)

Colonel Sponsz (768423) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773674)

Unfortunately, if that happens it will only bring the age of gov't mandated hardware DRM even closer - and then you can say goodbye to actually owning your own computer. What it's really time for is a property revolution - and I'm not talking about the Lenin/Che Guevara kind, I'm talking about actually giving people control over what they legally own. My computer? Then let me hack it as much as I want - software as well as hardware. My DVD? Then let me play it however I want (skip trailers, play it backwards, make my own "phantom edit"). All those things are already restricted by the DMCA and other laws, and it will only get worse unless somethings is done, soon...

Unfortunately (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773689)

The DRM on WMA will take longer to crack. What this means is that we'll have this neat pressure situation where all the content companies will demand to use WMA rather than, say, RealAudio or FairPlay because WMA is "unbreakable". And of course this means that by the time WMA DRM is finally cracked, all the other formats will be dead and WMA will be the unchangeable standard.

Re:We can only hope WMA will win! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773700)

And then a code monky from Argentina will be codeing at 3am and have a Mountain Dew inspired breakthrough, and WMA will be broken wide open forever.

Hello Sir,
You need to watch the Simpsons more. It is Rio de Janeiro whose streets is overrun by monkies. This is in Brazil, NOT Argentina!

Re:We can only hope WMA will win! (0, Flamebait)

cArnYgE (768770) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773752)

"Every media file on your computer will fall under one standard." Dude WMA sucks complete ass get your damnable facts straight. Every media file on my computer falls under one standard you ignorant fool. Fraunhofer's!

-cArnYgE

Boy howdy (3, Insightful)

aaronsb (138360) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773606)

That's not much of a crack now, is it?

damn (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773608)

They cracked this frist psot too...

Tin foil hat ON! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773611)

To me the authors are vandals not revolutionaries, and may have ensured WMA becomes the standard.

Well, obviously Bill Gates wrote the crack.

Re:Tin foil hat ON! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773703)

Bill Gates never wrote anything in his life. He's a salesman and a PHB.

I thought (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773754)

SCO were the ones who had a lock on the crack market right now?

Re:Tin foil hat ON! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773770)

Isn't it peculiar how the site is so-far magically immune to the slashdot effect? Hmmm...

Monkey See, Monkey Do (5, Insightful)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773612)

To me the authors are vandals not revolutionaries, and may have ensured WMA becomes the standard."

The problem with incredibly clever people is inevitably they come up with something you don't want. Who's to say they weren't WMA or even (shudder) RIAA proponents, bent on showing the public can't be trusted and DMCA is the right approach?

haiku for u! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773613)

You blank page mocks me,
Could this be first post?
shazbot is a cruel mistress...

I agree that they are vandals and scoundrels... (4, Troll)

csoto (220540) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773614)

but it's not as if WMA can't also be cracked.

ALL technological barriers can be subverted. It just takes the proper motivation, be it economic, political or otherwise.

I'll stick with purchasing tracks on iTMS. I love my iPod, iTunes and the quality and economical service Apple provides.

UnfairPlay (3, Interesting)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773615)

This thing proves brags that the "information wants to be free" concept will doom absolutely any music protection scheme, because somebody's bound to figure out how the thing works. They're right, and FairPlay has just bit the dust as a secure format.

Of course, you have to credit Apple for trying to build what they have, and maybe they'll be able to weather this storm because afterall, DVDs are still standing despite the existance of DeCSS. Maybe this will blow over and iTMS can stay in business... but this certainly isn't going to help.

Not Apple's problem (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773723)

I don't think Apple has anything at all to fear from people distributing their AACs and cutting into the iTMS profits. If people wanted to hunt down and download music files for free they would be doing that in the first place, instead of going to the iTMS; people use the iTMS out of concience or convenience already.

No, I think what Apple has to fear is that now that fairplay's been cracked, the RIAA will freak out, go "YOU TOLD US TEHY WOULDNT BE ABLE TO COPY TEH FILES", and pull apple's music licenses.

Re:UnfairPlay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773753)

Maybe this will blow over and iTMS can stay in business... but this certainly isn't going to help.

Oh please, why would this have any impact on iTMS business? Pretty much all the songs on the iTMS are allready out on unencrypted CDs, and hence on P2P filesharing networks.

In order to use this tool to decrypt a song, you have to be the legitimate purchaser of the song. So, if anything, this will add slightly to iTunes sales from the 'geek who wants to feel like a rebel by decrypting their music' market.

Need mac help (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773621)

I don't normally use a Mac but I need to right now.

- -
\_ (Apple button) (letter)

^
|
WTF is the first thing in this key command?

Re:Need mac help (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773635)

that would be the option key

Re:Need mac help (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773668)

Thanks, I know I can count on /. for answers within 1-2 minutes. Unlike usenet.

option (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773678)

Mac Help has an entry titled "Symbols for special keys" that lists all of these symbols and their meanings.

Let's hope (5, Funny)

nsample (261457) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773622)

I already have a removal tool for WMA. Just waiting for it to become a standard. ;)

Re:Let's hope (1, Funny)

funny-jack (741994) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773670)

So do I. It's called the 'Delete' key.

What was the point? (3, Insightful)

CrackedButter (646746) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773625)

The fairplay system allowed for FAIRPLAY, it is seen as the best DRM scheme online and yet somebody has to crack it? What for other than to get bragging rights and make AAC look inferior to WMA with its security protocols?

Re:What was the point? (5, Insightful)

Ziviyr (95582) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773750)

Maybe they wanted to play their paid for tunes on something other then iTunes or an iPod.

Queue up the zealots (1, Redundant)

slash-tard (689130) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773633)

Since this is Apple its wrong.

If it was Microsoft or some other company ITMS users would flaming it up and laughing at how bad they suck.

Re:Queue up the zealots (2, Interesting)

loveisafist (766873) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773756)

The difference is Microsoft really does want to control what you see and hear and how you see and hear it. Apple released a DRM scheme that was trying to be as fair to both parties as legally possible. The RIAA (and their controlled labels) would have never cooperated with their ITMS if they had offered completely 'open' songs.

Now that someone has broken their 'fair' DRM it is another example the RIAA will use to try and further tighten their control over any kind of music distribution. If MS claims that their WMA offers the most superior protection against sharing then which do you think RIAA wll mandate?

FoulPlay (2, Interesting)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773638)

Why is SourceForge allowing this kind of project on their site? This is purely a copyright-protection defeating program, and what's more, it's defeating one of the most liberal copyright-protection schemes in existance.

I'd hope SourceForge will be smart enough to delete this program rather than risk losing the site over it...

Re:FoulPlay (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773673)

SourceForge has already deleted it off of all mirrors.

Re:FoulPlay (3, Interesting)

jmv (93421) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773684)

it's defeating one of the most liberal copyright-protection schemes in existance.

So you mean it's liberal enough to allow me to play files in Linux?

Re:FoulPlay (3, Insightful)

ImpTech (549794) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773691)

> it's defeating one of the most liberal copyright-protection schemes in existance.

What about actual copyright law?

Re:FoulPlay (1)

timmy the large (223281) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773711)

Whats wrong with defeating copy protection? Is it wrong to make a tool that can be used for something you consider morally wrong?

Re:FoulPlay (4, Informative)

Shimmer (3036) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773761)

At the moment, it's illegal in the US under the DMCA. You might not like it, but that's a different question.

Re:FoulPlay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773768)

I think you forgot the word "only". It is wrong to make a tool that can only be used for something you consider morally wrong.

It seems like this is one of those tools.

Re:FoulPlay (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773755)

Please stop posting to slashdot so much.

Re:FoulPlay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773783)

Screw you, you square.

LostCluster has sold out to Tha Man! "oooooo... it's illeeeeegal! wahhh wahhh"

What kind of comment is that? (1)

Andorion (526481) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773642)

To me the authors are vandals not revolutionaries, and may have ensured WMA becomes the standard

Why can't I do whatever I choose with the music I pay for? What if I want to put it on my other solid-state mp3 player, in mp3 format? This is a good utility.

~Berj

Re:What kind of comment is that? (3, Insightful)

funny-jack (741994) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773695)

Why can't I do whatever I choose with the music I pay for?

Because when you pay for it, you agree to a set of restrictions on what you can do with it. Don't like those restrictions? Buy it somewhere else.

Re:What kind of comment is that? (1)

CrackedButter (646746) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773782)

A very good valid point and its something I would of responded with. The parent DID agree to a set of rules and now whines about the restrictions, hello you entered into an agreement. Besides you can rerip the AAC file into MP3 anyway, with iTunes as well using its own tools. You seem ignorant (parent) and stupid all in one post.

Re:What kind of comment is that? (0)

Benneh (709476) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773714)

Because you're not trusted. In the end all we are, are license holders for someone else's property and we have to respect their terms, not have the music or face the consequences of the law (regardless of the fact that at present, these consequences are aimed at very few people).

Re:What kind of comment is that? (1)

2nd Post! (213333) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773778)

What if I want to put it on my other solid-state mp3 player, in mp3 format?

As the name Fairplay suggests, if you want to convert it to mp3 format, iTunes will allow for that!

It's not *convenient*, but it is easy!

Burn to a CD; rerip as an mp3, and copy protection is defeated.

To me the authors are vandals not revolutionaries (1)

Omega1045 (584264) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773645)

Serioulsy, how long is it going to take for a crack to come out for the Windows Media DRM? If they broken Apple's, it won't be too long. I would be it will happen inside 6 months...

The author implies that... (4, Insightful)

Limecron (206141) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773647)

Micrsoft DRM *won't* be cracked?

If *anything* is crack fodder after this...

But seriously, the first thing to crack is what people actually use. So, good job crackers.

Anyway, how is unlocking something you've paid for being a vandal?

Re:The author implies that... (1)

InfiniterX (12749) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773745)

Anyway, how is unlocking something you've paid for being a vandal?

This serves up on a silver platter for the RIAA that consumers aren't deserving of even these incredibly unobtrusive forms of DRM, because they will crack it.

The iTunes store afforded consumers much more freedom with their purchases than any of the other online stores, and this software may well have a hand in taking that away.

Is FairPlay really better than WMA? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773649)

To me the authors are vandals not revolutionaries, and may have ensured WMA becomes the standard.

If DRM is offensive to you, than FairPlay is no better than WMA.

If you don't particularly mind DRM, then what's your complaint about WMA? I think it is the iTunes contract you like, and not FairPlay itself.

Re:Is FairPlay really better than WMA? (1)

labratuk (204918) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773803)

Very good point, and one I was going to make before I saw that you had already posted it.

I think it's the Apple fanboy in him talking and not his logic.

Vandals? Not likely. (1)

Just Some Guy (3352) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773653)

To me the authors are vandals not revolutionaries, and may have ensured WMA becomes the standard.

Then I'm glad your opinion doesn't count for anything. I like and respect what Apple is doing with iTunes as much as the next person, but they haven't been getting my money because I have no way to play their music on my platform of choice. I personally don't care what the license/contract/whatever is that I have to agree to; if I pay someone to listen to music, then I'll use whatever tool is available to hear it wherever I darn well want, whether the store approves or not. It's my song, morally if not legally.

WMA the standard because "FairPlay" is cracked? Sure, and DivX will become the standard DVD format because CSS was cracked.

Big surprise (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773655)

Anyone who didn't see this coming.. i don't know what you were thinking.

Apple chose the "cheap bike lock" model. Instead of trying to absolutely lock down their digital music distribution, they put an [i]impairment[/i] to fully free use of the music, but one which they knew would eventually be broken. This is a rational thing; if you KNOW that someone, if they REALLY wanted to, would be able to break your encryption, what's the point of trying to make the encryption really strong?

The trick is, you wait for the inevitable crack program, then attempt to prevent people from distributing it.

Of course the interesting thing is, now Apple's going to go after the people who made this tool, and hundreds of Slashdotters will most likely deride it as an unconsiable use of the DMCA, then announce they are boycotting Apple and dumping the iTMS for, say, Napter2... which uses WMA, whose DRM is even worse...

ed2k mirror here! (-1, Troll)

586 (137798) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773666)

Re:ed2k mirror here! (0)

586 (137798) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773690)

sorry for that here is the real link:
ed2k://|file|playfair-0.2.tar.gz|444241|526 CDEA1EF D77ECBBFFBF2D76B6DD8B3|/

Vandals! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773667)

Yes, totally. Similarly, I think anybody who writes notes in the margins of college textbooks should be put in prison. There's nothing in the license of the textbook that allows them to do that, and for all we know they're just going to sell them back to a used bookstore later, allowing other people to cheat on their classes and ruin the American education system! When will this fair use madness end?

Vandals? Plus redistrubuting would be copyright i (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773672)

I don't see them as vandals any more than the DeCSS authors are. As you said yourself this only allows people to access data they already havea license for. Now the fact that some of them will distribute copies is their bad act, not the tool's authors' bad act. And not only would it be a contractual breech but it would be copyright infringement plain and simple. I hope people that do that get caught and prosectuted as they should. But I don't support calling the tool's makers "vandals".

Your point about WMA is good though. This may just have that effect. Unless someone "breaks" WMA too.

Fair use, and nothing but fair use (3, Insightful)

isomeme (177414) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773677)

To me the authors are vandals not revolutionaries, and may have ensured WMA becomes the standard.
Interesting position. How is rearranging the bits of something I own "vandalism"? How is this not a perfect example of fair use?

I agree that redistributing the results would be both unethical and illegal. But last I hear prior restraint was still frowned on by the courts.

Re:Fair use, and nothing but fair use (1)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773764)

Interesting position. How is rearranging the bits of something I own "vandalism"? How is this not a perfect example of fair use?

Because the DMCA took exactly this kind of tool out of the fair use category years ago. "Fair" in morality doesn't have to equate to "fair use" as defined by the law...

DeCSS (5, Insightful)

Jeffrey Baker (6191) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773679)

Lots of ignorant comments already. PlayFair is the same as DeCSS: it removes restrictions on fair use, and allows compatibility. Now I can play my paid-for iTunes songs wherever I wish, just as DeCSS allowed me to play DVDs anywhere.

It's a good thing.

Re:DeCSS (1)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773702)

Yep, but that also means that PlayFair is about to become another DMCA-powered third rail of software. Don't bother mirroring this program unless you can afford the lawsuit... SourceForge's going to have a tough call to make soon.

Re:DeCSS (1)

Jeffrey Baker (6191) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773793)

Sourceforge already pulled it.

I think this is good (5, Insightful)

shadowcabbit (466253) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773685)

Contrary to the knee-jerk reaction (and incidentally, also contrary to the blurb), I think that this tool is a blessing. Since it only works on songs that you have a valid license for (ie stuff you bought), it removes the burn-to-cd step from the "buy from ITMS, burn to CD, re-rip to MP3" process for those of us who don't have an iPod. I've bought quite a bit of music from the store, and I relish the opportunity to use it on my Lyra. This, I think, was the developers' intention with this tool-- not infringement. This is the only use I will have for this tool. Others may use it improperly or illegally, but that does not mean I should be denied access to the tool.

Watermarked (1)

Malc (1751) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773693)

If it's watermarked, then that's fair enough. If you choose to breach copyright law then that's your fault. I do disagree with your stance on calling these people vandals. They've just made it possible for me to use my purchase in the way I see fit. I.e. any kind media shifting I desire. They've also made my life easier maintaining access to the those files years down the road. I have no intention of breaking the copyright laws where I live, so I couldn't care less if the files are watermarked...

Well, on second thoughts: what happens if I let somebody check their email on my computer and they steal the files and then release themselves? I guess watermarking becomes a problem.

Re:Watermarked (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773789)

They've just made it possible for me to use my purchase in the way I see fit. I.e. any kind media shifting I desire.

It just removes the copy protection. It's still AAC encoded, yes? Which means a lot of portables still wouldn't know what to do with the file. Of course you could re-encode to OGG/MP3, but then you are losing quality.

but why (1)

ickna (741290) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773696)

I smell another DeCSS incident coming..

Re:but why (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773758)

I smell another DeCSS incident coming..
Nah, that's yourself that you smell.

they wrote it on crack (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773697)

one of the most interesting things about this project is the authors were actually on crack while they wrote it. it was a test of whether drugs could induce creativity for breaking encryption.

Point of contention (1, Insightful)

proverbialcow (177020) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773701)

To me the authors are vandals not revolutionaries, and may have ensured WMA becomes the standard.

And yet you do them the service of propagating news of their work through Slashdot, to people (like myself) who have oft wondered about the feasibility of cracking Fairplay, yet otherwise would not have known.

Good job.

God damn (1)

Tobias Luetke (707936) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773704)

This is exactly the reason why we need hardware based DRM as soon as possible. Software based DRM just doesn't work and its proven to the pioneers in the industry over and over again.

No DRM means i'll never be able to oneclick download the games i'd like to play, it means that i'll never be able to just watch the movies running in the cinema on my home theature for a couple of bucks and in this case that I can't just get the music iIlike within seconds.

I REALLY don't want to walk to stores anymore for music.
Likewise I really don't want to have the CD-ROM in my drive for every game I play.

Probably Hired by MS to Crack it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773709)

What are the odds that Microsoft has paid for the crack. This would certainly be in Microsoft's best interest.

Incorrect background on VeriDisc/FairPlay (5, Informative)

ikewillis (586793) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773715)

When Apple opened the iTunes Music Store, they licensed a technology called "FairPlay" from a company called "Veridisc".

Apple bought VeriDisc. They didn't license FairPlay; they own it.

Tough to enforce everybody's rights all at once (1)

hattig (47930) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773716)

This will become useful for those people who buy music from iTMS and who have more computers / AAC devices than what AAC DRM allows.

Hopefully it won't be used by people to create AAC albums for download, that will lead to harsher DRM in the future that may be even harder to remove.

If Apple had any sense, then they will have watermarked the AAC files in some way to identify the owner of the file (okay, the owner of the license to play the music contained within the file) - this was probably a requirement to get iTMS off the ground to be honest. If you use this software to remove the DRM and then share the files, don't be surprised if you get in trouble for it down the line!

It is a bit hard to enforce strictly the right for the music owner to play the music they own on any device in the house or on their person, or in their car, whilst preventing the copying of said music to another person's computer/car/etc.

Especially as that creation, the CD-R, bypasses a lot of the issues :)

Now if only music was cheaper in the shops, and the artist got a fair proportion of the proceeds ... the problem with copied music would be a lot less. Hell, if music was free to download at 64kbps mono (for example) then everyone can preview the music (the argument for file sharing) and then choose to buy the high quality version, or just use the naff version. File sharing is the Radio of the 21st century. Adapt or die.

This is like a selling point (5, Insightful)

AtariAmarok (451306) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773717)

Having this available is like a selling point for ITMS. I've been rather resistant about buying songs there because they place restrictions about what I can do with my own data on my own machine. (and no, I'm not talking about selling them).

maybe now you can have fair use (1)

User 956 (568564) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773719)

With this, if you move out of the country (i.e. Canada, for all you bush-hating hippies), all your honestly-bought itunes won't become useless [google.com] .

Vandals ?!# (3, Interesting)

PrimeNumber (136578) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773720)

The cracking operation can only be done on songs the user has already has valid licenses for and requires either an iPod or a windows computer for key recovery.

Is this article a cleverly disguised troll?

If anything the creator(s) of PlayFair are doing the responsible thing, and not allowing the user to perform a so-called cracking operation on a song they haven't licensed/paid for.

AAC DRM Cracked? (1)

jerel (112066) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773724)

Ok, then does this mean that I can finally remove the DRM from the Audible.com files that I PURCHASED and cannot play on MY non-DRM MP3 player? I use the almost-useless little Otis player because I have to (or buy an iPod, which I can't afford) and I'd much rather have these files in an MP3 (or OGG) format. I do not have a Mac or an iPod so I hope they generalize this for the rest of us.

Just give it some time... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773726)

Just give it some time and WMA and all the other competing technologies will be cracked as well and the playing field will be level again. I don't think this will have any effect, long term, on what file format becomes the much-hyped .mp3 replacement.

Is today attack media player day? (0, Offtopic)

t0qer (230538) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773728)

Slashdot, it really whips the apples llama in the ass to think different in soviet russia.
3. Profit!

Imagine a beowulf cluster of ml_ipod plugins.

So let me get this straight... (2, Insightful)

ChangeOnInstall (589099) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773732)

I can now go iTunes using my Windows XP box that doesn't even have speakers, buy music tracks, run them through this DRM remover, and then play them back on my Linux machines at home and at work?

If this actually turns out to be the case, I'll be sending Apple (iTunes) about $20-50/month for the forseeable future.

If it can be made, it can be broke (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773734)

Everything can be gotten around. It would be crappy if this could cause Itunes to lose steam. (If they had any). Music should be like TV... the shows are free, but you have to watch the commercials. (looking at my cable bill) it seems I have to pay for the commercials, and I have to pay for Tivo to skip the commercials.

Eh, screw it all. If I had the money and the willpower I would boycott it all, but after 12 hours of work, being able to pick up the remote and watch the shows I want to watch, or use Itunes and listen to the music I want to listen, has made me fat and lazy!! But I love it though....

On a itunes related note, my wife asked if I wanted an Ipod for our anniversary, I said no I wanted an Ibanez artcore guitar. In two years the ipod maybe dead, or obsolete, but with the guitar it will sound great for a lifetime. Besides making my own music is more fun then listening to someone else's!

an analogy for you all (1)

edrugtrader (442064) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773738)

having DRM built into copyrighted works is like having a car with a built in speed limiter that didn't let you go over the speed limit.

these people are not vandals. what if they sat on this until the whole industry DEPENDED on the idea that it was secure? AND THEN they released the exploit? they should be hired by apple.

Vandals?? (3, Insightful)

morelife (213920) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773739)

To me the authors are vandals not revolutionaries, and may have ensured WMA becomes the standard

By the intro blurb, I could not tell who said this.. no matter.

Programming a utility which circumvents Apple's DRM in Fairplay - or whatever it actually accomplishes - does well to show the weakness of that implementation, and is therefore valuable in two ways --

by proving false that any "security" is provided, and

this will get Apple to improve its implementation, and demonstrate if it really cares enough to do so.

Unfortunately, I won't hold my breath waiting for Apple to invoke the DMCA here against any "criminals" who use it; that's bound to happen soon enough.

If Apple doesn't want WMA to become the standard, let Apple get its act together with a demonstrably good implementation of the DRM idea, one which can't be cracked.

These programmers are no more vandals than Dmitri Skylarov, and Apple should realize that they're doing them a favor - for FREE.

Anybody have time to look at the code? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 10 years ago | (#8773741)

The breif descriptions says the following:

Most of the heavy lifting for this program is done by the mp4v2 and mp4ff libraries.

Does this thing reencode the files? If so, how is this any sort of breakthrough? We could already do that.

Please pardon my French (1, Flamebait)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773748)

To me the authors are vandals not revolutionaries, and may have ensured WMA becomes the standard.

Fuck you buddy. No one has the right to tell someone what they can or can't do with something that they have purchased. If I wanted to ulock an AAC file with the intention of converting it to Ogg or MP3, that's my business.

Please explain to us how one can vandalize something that he or she owns. I'm sure we'd all like to hear your explaination.

LK

Vandals, eh? (4, Insightful)

cb8100 (682693) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773762)

From Merriam-Webster:

One entry found for vandal.
Main Entry: vandal
Pronunciation: 'van-d&l
Function: noun
Etymology: Latin Vandalii (plural), of Germanic origin
2 : one who willfully or ignorantly destroys, damages, or defaces property belonging to another or to the public

Since I bought the music, it does not belong to the public. If I choose to remove the DRM that keeps me from doing what I want with my private property, that's not vandalism. Worst case: I just voided my song's warranty

Why would someone do this (3, Interesting)

hamsterdude (610279) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773765)

I don't understand. I'm as pro peer-to-peer sharing as the next slashdot reader. Since I discovered the joys of kazaa (and Poisoned since switching to my Mac) I've discovered music that i never would have heard otherwise, and this has led me to spend far more in CDs than I would have/can afford. But I also see that iTunes music store is great, it means that those who actually want to pay for music aren't restricted to doing so by buying CDs, when I pay for music I do so because I want the artist to earn from their work. If you wanted to there isn't a single song on iTunes you couldn't get over a p2p network. All this will do is turn the record companies against the iTMS and damage a great service. And seriously, it's not like the FairPlay liscence is all that restrictive, making ten copies of a downloaded album? I think that's fair!

Largely irrelevant. (4, Interesting)

Llywelyn (531070) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773766)

The cracking operation can only be done on songs the user has already has valid licenses for and requires either an iPod or a windows computer for key recovery.

Let's emphasize this part. You still have to go through the trouble of downloading it, compiling it, and using it on your own songs. I don't see many people doing this just to share them over a P2P network.

There would be a problem if this was something that could decrypt other's songs. If you do a search there are people sharing m4p files on filesharing networks (mainly because they just share their music library) and so the ability to then download those files and decrypt them would be more serious. As it stands with this program, I have to go through that for my own files, which I wouldn't go through the trouble of doing unless FairPlay got in my way, which it doesn't.

Even then, however, I suspect it would not be a major concern. Apple expected this kind of thing and has a philosophy that most people will pay for their service regardless of if they can get it free elsewhere--simply because they will pay for quality and service.

And what exactly is the problem with WMA? (1)

i)ave (716746) | more than 10 years ago | (#8773800)

Over at ExtremeTech, they have a great article right now that compares OGG/WMA/MP3/AAC codecs and their conclusion is that AAC is the best overall codec in terms of quality. Codec Shootout [extremetech.com]

So, Perhaps, AAC needs to be "broken" in order to prevent an inferior codec standard from gaining too much momentum. This already happened with MP3. Personally, I like the idea of OGG, and it received a strong 2nd place finish in the report.
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